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Major changes likely coming to your health care coverage

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Tampa, March 7, 2017 | comments
"It's pretty horrendous, that's not our values here," said Democratic Congresswoman Kathy Castor as she stood in front of Memorial Hospital of Tampa.
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By Paul LaGrone, broadcast on WFTS on March 7, 2017


"It's pretty horrendous, that's not our values here," said Democratic Congresswoman Kathy Castor as she stood in front of Memorial Hospital of Tampa.

Congresswoman Castor said, "We're going to take the exchange away but people will still get access which means they will go here to the Memorial ER."

The republicans just rolled out their plan to replace Obamacare on Monday.

Two of the key changes:

The requirement to buy insurance goes away and insurers still have to cover pre-existing conditions, but they'll be able to charge more for people who are recently uninsured.

Joe Nammour has multiple sclerosis. He's worried the changes will make it harder for him to find affordable insurance.

"What we quickly realized is.. it was an automatic denial across the board, no one would cover someone  with multiple sclerosis," he said.

For small businesses like All Phase Glass and Mirror Company in Tampa, the Affordable Care Act has been anything but affordable.

They may see some relief because they'll no longer be under a federal mandate to provide insurance---Insurance that's costing them and they're employees more.

"Right now premiums are sky high and your deductibles are high," says co-owner Kristie Hall

There's also the question of how this is being presented.

Democrats and even some Republicans say it's being shoved through Congress.

It hasn't gone through the Congressional Budget Office, which means lawmakers have "no idea" how much this bill will cost and how many people will be left without insurance.

One thing that does stay the same under the republican plan: Adult children can stay on their parents plan till age 26.

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