Help with Federal Grants

This page will provide you with a central location to search the wealth of information available from both government and private entities who offer financing to individuals, businesses and state and local governments. The links on this page offer helpful information that will enable you research information efficiently and will guide you on writing grant proposals.

Grants and Federal Domestic Assistance
Key sources for grantseekers on federal and private grants information.

Financial Aid for Students
Sources for parents and students on locating and applying for financial aid.

Business Opportunities with the Federal Government
Sources for business entrepreneurs on selling to the government and getting started in federal procurement. Includes sites on subcontracting and on selling to the military.

Interested in a letter from Congresswoman Castor regarding your grant application?

Application to Request Grant Letter
Fill out this form to request a letter of introduction from Congresswoman Castor for your grant application.

How Best to Find Information

  1. Find out Who is Eligible for a Grant? Other government websites may be more suitable for personal needsstudent loanssmall business assistance, or other business opportunities such as government contracting. The website Government Benefits, Grants, and Financial Aid may also be of help.
  2. If eligible, search for programs in the Catalog of Federal Domestic Assistance (CFDA). Includes grants, loans, business and nonfinancial help.
  3. Check current federal grants opportunities at Grants.gov, obtain a Dun and Bradstreet (DUNS) number, register with System for Award Management (SAM), and apply online (links and instructions given at the website). Additional notices appear at FedConnect.
  4. Learn how to write grant proposals: Take the free online Foundation Center Proposal Writing Short Course or see other tips and sample proposals at Grantspace's How Do I Write a Grant Proposal?


Key Federal Funding Sources

Catalog of Federal Domestic Assistance (General Services Administration)
The CFDA, issued annually and updated continuously on the Web, describes some 1600 federal grants and non-financial assistance programs. Grantseekers can identify programs that might support their projects and can learn the program's objectives, requirements, application procedures and contacts. For current notices of funding availability, see Grants.gov or FedConnect.

Grants.gov (managed by Dept. of Health and Human Services)
Federal website that allows eligible grantseekers (see Who is Eligible for a Grant?) to find and apply for current competitive grant opportunities from ALL federal agencies. Grantseekers can check on notices of funding availability (NOFAs) posted in the last 7 days; access an RSS feed of grant opportunities; and apply for federal grants through a unified process by downloading the application and submitting online. The website guides grantseekers in obtaining a Dun and Bradstreet (DUNS) number, registering with System for Award Management (SAM), and registering with Grants.gov to apply and to track applications.

Related Federal Resources

A-Z Index of U.S. Government Departments and Agencies (General Services Administration)
To better develop a grant proposal, search a department or agency's Home Page to learn more about its programs and objectives. The site USA.gov also links to Government Benefits, Grants and Financial Aid.

Student Aid on the Web (Department of Education)
Financial assistance for education beyond high school is generally "needs-based" and often includes loans and work-study, in addition to some grants. College and university applications, websites, and brochures usually include financial aid information for prospective and incoming students.

Benefits.gov (via Department of Labor)
Government grants are not direct assistance to individuals, but fund state and local programs providing help to those in need. This online screening site can be used to identify state and local government benefits and how to apply. Covers direct payments, loans, insurance, training, or other services.

FTC Consumer Alert (Federal Trade Commission)
The FTC warns consumers to beware of paying "processing fees" for information that is available free to the public. Ads claiming federal grants are available for home repairs, home business, unpaid bills, or other personal expenses are often a scam.